Rebuilding Community Connections

Top-quality medical care does not reach everybody in our communities. Patients have unique needs that our faculty and staff work hard to address. This includes veterans, immigrants, and the unhoused, among others. Stanford’s Department of Medicine is rebuilding community connections and bringing care to underserved populations by integrating medicine and artificial intelligence, partnering with health care clinics around the Bay Area, and expanding our medical collaborations with health care programs around the world. The key is combining cutting-edge medical expertise and resources with trusted service in vulnerable communities.

Rethinking Care and Community in Community-Based Care

Rethinking Care and Community in Community-Based Care

For decades, universities and medical programs have made it easy to train to practice medicine in big care centers that are less accessible to underserved populations. Growing collaborations between the Department of Medicine and Bay Area community clinics are helping physicians give back to underserved communities and clinics expand the impact of their expertise and community trust.

Revitalizing Veteran Care

Revitalizing Veteran Care

Staffing shortages during the COVID-19 pandemic prompted an innovative program using student volunteers to engage veterans remotely—with astounding results.

Stanford Scores Big Wins for Equitable Healthcare

Stanford Scores Big Wins for Equitable Healthcare

Stanford researchers break down barriers to equitable care with research designed with and for patients, while getting support from payers finally recognizing the value of previously underutilized tools and strategies.

Unleashing the Power of AI in Primary Care

Unleashing the Power of AI in Primary Care

Stanford Healthcare AI Applied Research Team (HEA₃RT) is redefining health care by unleashing the potential of artificial intelligence — from relieving physician burnout to advancing equity to groundbreaking collaborations with industry giants like Google and cutting-edge technologies like ChatGPT.

Where Health Care Is a Luxury

Where Health Care Is a Luxury

Thousands of village dwellers in rural Cambodia wait as many as 10 hours every day to see a physician in the annual medical mission of the Cambodian Health Professionals Association of America. A Stanford professor of medicine has been volunteering with this organization for the past decade, extending the expertise of American medicine to people for whom health care is a luxury.

Stanford Is Going South

Stanford Is Going South

Stanford’s brand-new cardiovascular medicine clinic delivers comprehensive cardiovascular care close to home for the South Bay community, while Stanford Medicine gets a more diverse patient population.

Community Engagement

Pause, Reflect, and Begin Again

Pause, Reflect, and Begin Again

In on-the-street interviews, staff members share how they recharge energy for their professional and personal lives, contemplate positive change in the Department of Medicine, and embody the spirit of renewal through their expressions of resilience, hope, and optimism.

Paid Summer Internship Program Furthers Stanford Commitment to Diversity, Equity, Inclusion

Paid Summer Internship Program Furthers Stanford Commitment to Diversity, Equity, Inclusion

Do you have to attend Stanford to get a job there? Are there other ways to work in health care besides going to medical school? These are some of the questions posed by many college undergraduates. The Department of Medicine’s Paid Internship Program provides answers, while creating connections with prospective employees who are passionate about diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging.

From Bariatric Surgeon to Accidental Activist

From Bariatric Surgeon to Accidental Activist

Academic physician Arghavan Salles has dedicated her career to conducting research that sheds light on societal problems and pushes our institutions toward more inclusive policies. In this interview, she examines how social media has proven to be integral to that work.

Making the Meaning of ‘First-Generation’ From College to Career

Making the Meaning of ‘First-Generation’ From College to Career

What does being a “first-generation college student” mean to the students themselves? Three staff members in the Department of Medicine revisit what it means for them to be first-generation college students, offer insights into the struggles that first-generation students face after graduation, and give suggestions for how first-generation graduates can succeed in their careers at Stanford.

Education

Translational Investigators — the Future of Team Science

Translational Investigators — the Future of Team Science

Meet the newest physician-scientists at Stanford! These young doctors are starting their multiyear training in the Translational Investigator Program, working with peers and mentors to synergize their talents. This year’s interns are especially diverse, bringing unique backgrounds, perspectives, and passion to their quest to tackle some of medicine’s grand challenges.

The Pre-Renal Initiative

The Pre-Renal Initiative

The nationwide epidemics of diabetes and obesity have created a huge, unmet need for nephrologists to treat the chronic kidney disease that often results from these conditions. The Pre-Renal Initiative is designed to attract undergraduate college students to the field of nephrology before they even enter medical school.

CHIP: Where Artificial Intelligence and Cardiology Come Together

CHIP: Where Artificial Intelligence and Cardiology Come Together

Artificial intelligence (AI) may strike fear into your heart, but Stanford’s Computational Medicine in the Heart: Integrated Training Program (CHIP) is using it for heart health. The key, says CHIP Director Sanjiv M. Narayan, MD, PhD, is to recognize that AI is a powerful tool to support clinical care, not replace clinicians.

Clinical Care

How to Endure in a Pandemic? Magic!

How to Endure in a Pandemic? Magic!

What’s it take to solve a Rubik’s Cube? Hospitalist, bioinformatician, and magician Jonathan Chen can solve the puzzle in seconds. While magicians never divulge their tricks, this one reveals how those tricks helped him deal with the worst year of his life.

Two Residents, United in Equality, Are Fighting Health Disparities

Two Residents, United in Equality, Are Fighting Health Disparities

Christine Santiago, MD, and Natasha Steele MD, are magnets for change. Read how their childhood experiences of navigating the healthcare system as minorities didn’t break them, but instead drove them to emphasize quality, diversity, and humanity as they seek better health outcomes.

From Oncology Staff to Oncology Patient

From Oncology Staff to Oncology Patient

Kristy Kerivan has worked for the Stanford School of Medicine for 20-plus years, currently in the division of oncology. When she was diagnosed with breast cancer, Kerivan went from employee to patient, and she developed a deeper appreciation for cancer care and research at Stanford.

Tying Together Pelvic Health and the Microbiome

Tying Together Pelvic Health and the Microbiome

With its coordinated multidisciplinary focus, the Stanford Pelvic Health Program offers relief from suffering that cannot be found anywhere else. In research led by Leila Neshatian, MD, the program is exploring how the microbiome reflects the health of pelvic muscles, which could lead to novel therapies for embarrassing and painful pelvic pathologies.

Research

Renewing the Field

Renewing the Field

Meet four exceptional physician-scientist research fellows who are ushering in a new era in infectious disease. Delve into their groundbreaking work, learn how they’re making the world healthier, and hear how they blow off steam to stay sane in a highly competitive field.

Driving Medical Progress

Driving Medical Progress

The career of Susan Jacobs, RN, MS, has transformed pulmonary research, shaping it from scratch to a program of roughly 30 diverse trials. A beacon of dedication and expertise, she navigates complex trials and supports patients while mentoring budding researchers.

Teaching Tolerance to the Immune System

Teaching Tolerance to the Immune System

Building off the incredible success of cancer immunotherapies, researchers are now reprogramming the human immune system to prevent organ rejection and treat autoimmune disease.

Revealing Microbial Triggers of Autoimmune Disease

Revealing Microbial Triggers of Autoimmune Disease

A team led by William Robinson, MD, PhD, is revolutionizing scientists’ understanding of how routine viral infections can contribute to chronic autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

On the Hunt for Knowledge

On the Hunt for Knowledge

Hematologists Peter Greenberg, MD, and Gabe Mannis, MD, are laser-focused on finding better treatments for myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia, respectively. Every answer on the path forward leads to new questions. Discover what they’re asking now.